Readings

Day 1: Discovering Graffiti Soldiers

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  • Stephen Robertson, Syllabus – HIST 390 The Digital Past (2015)
  • Katherine Reed, “”Charcoal scribblings of the most rascally character”: conflict, identity, and testimony in American Civil War graffiti,” Nineteenth Century History (2015)
  • Robert E. Bonner, The Soldier’s Pen: Firsthand Impressions of the Civil War (New York: Hill & Wang, 2006), 1-11 and chapter 7.

Day 2: Stories About Soldiers

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Stereotypes

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  • Joseph Glatthaar, ““Touched with Fire”: Uncommon Soldiers of the Civil War,” OAH Magazine of History 26, 2 (2012): 19-24.
  • Jason Philips, “Battling Stereotypes: A Taxonomy of Common Soldiers in Civil War History,” History Compass 6, 6 (2008).
  • Aaron Sheehan-Dean,“The Blue and the Gray in Black and White: Assessing the Scholarship on Civil War Soldiers,” in The View from the Ground: Experiences of Civil War Soldiers (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 2006).

Day 3: Soldiers’ Drawings

Soldiers Pen

 

 

 

 

  • Robert E. Bonner, The Soldier’s Pen: Firsthand Impressions of the Civil War (New York: Hill & Wang, 2006), 50-51, 66-69, 73, 89-91, 93-94, 108-112, 113, 118-119, illustrations following 136, 158, 170-171, 195-196, 211.

Day 3: Soldiers in Combat

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Soldiers Pen

 

 

 

 

  • Gerald Linderman, Embattled Courage: The Experience of Combat in the American Civil War (New York: Free Press, 1987), chapter 6, 113-133.
  • Earl Hess, The Union Soldier in Battle: Enduring the Ordeal of Combat (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1997), chapter 3, 45-72.
  • Robert E. Bonner, The Soldier’s Pen: Firsthand Impressions of the Civil War (New York: Hill & Wang, 2006), chapter 3.

Day 4: Soldiers After the War

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  • James Marten, Sing Not War: The Lives of Union and Confederate Veterans in Gilded Age America (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2011), 75-91.
  • Dixon Wechter, When Johnny Comes Marching Home (1944), 83-94. 

Day 4: Monuments to the Common Soldier

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  • Kathryn Jacob, Testament to Union: Civil War Monuments in Washington, D.C. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), 63-68.

Day 5: Gettysburg – Battlefields, Burial, & Monuments

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  • Kirk Savage, Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War, and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997), chapter 6, “Common Soldiers.”
  • John Neff, Honoring the Civil War Dead: Commemoration and the Problem of Reconciliation (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2005), 103-141.
  • Drew Faust, “”The Dread Void of Uncertainty”: Naming the Dead in the American Civil War,” Southern Cultures 11, 2 (Summer 2005): 7-32.
  • Edward Linenthal, Sacred Ground: Americans and their Battlefields (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993), 87-126.

Day 6: Piecing it Together

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